Wisconsin Additional Challenges Selection Tool

Purpose

The purpose of this tool is to assist school and district teams in identifying research- and evidence-based additional challenges as a part of their multi-level system of support for reading and mathematics.

 

Rationale

While extensive lists of additional challenges and gifted and talented resources exist, schools struggle to find the research and/or evidence basis that supports whether these strategies or products have been shown to positively impact learner outcomes.

 

Important Disclaimers

  • Inclusion on, or absence from, the Additional Challenges Selection Tool does not in any way constitute endorsement or recommendation from the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction or the Wisconsin RtI Center

  • The Additional Challenges Selection Tool is not intended to be an exhaustive list of additional challenges. Furthermore, there is no requirement that compels Wisconsin schools to use this tool to select additional challenges.

  • The Additional Challenges Selection Tool is focused only on the specific academic areas of reading and Mathematics, the Wisconsin RtI Center’s content areas of focus. It does not include additional challenges for gifts, talents, and high achievement in intellectual, creative, artistic, leadership, or specific academic areas beyond reading and Mathematics.

  • It is possible that an additional challenge not appearing in the Additional Challenges Selection Tool fits the needs of a school developing a coherent plan of support for high-achieving students. In all cases, it is the responsibility of the school or district team to determine whether any additional challenge has its intended outcome with the students served by the school or district.

 

Help, Updates, and Suggestions

If you have questions about how to use this tool, please contact your Wisconsin RtI Center technical assistance coordinator (TAC). See http://www.wisconsinrticenter.org/regional-coordinators.html to identify the TAC for your region.

 
In order to enhance its ongoing value to schools, this tool and the submissions below will be reviewed and updated semi-annually. We encourage your participation in this process.
 
To provide feedback on the value of this tool, to suggest additional practices or programs for inclusion, or to point us to additional substantive research/evidence that supports the additional challenges listed, please use this form.
 
Note that recommendations via email, phone, or other forms of personal communication will not be considered.

Filters

Definitions: Click here for a short list of definitions

Level of Support Recommended grade level(s) Academic Area Type of Challenge Type of evidence
1 for Universal/Tier 1
2 for Selected/Tier 2
3 for Intensive/Tier 3
P for Primary (k-2)
I for Intermediate (3-5)
M for middle grades (6-8)
H for high school (9-12)
ELA (for English Language Arts)
MATH (for Mathematics)
Program
Practice
Competition
Resource
Software
None /anecdotal / perception
Theoretical research base
Accreditation / Expert Review
Program evaluation
Meta-analysis
Qualitative research
Experimental
Additional Challenge
Level of Support
Grade Level(s)
Academic Area
Challenge
Description
Type of evidence
Research source
24 Game 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H MATH Resource The 24 Game was developed by inventor Robert Sun to help students develop number sense and sharpen math skills including problem solving, critical thinking, and pattern sensing. The object of the game: Make the number 24 from the four numbers on game cards of increasing difficulty. Available in multiple formats: card game, competition, iPad app. Details here. None /anecdotal / perception For more information click here.
A Teacher's Guide To Using the Common Core State Standards with Gifted and Advanced Learners 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Resource These National Association for Gifted Children published books (one for ELA, one for Math) to provide educators with examples and strategies to implement the CCSS in ELA and mathematics with K-12 gifted and advanced learners. The books offers strategies for accelerating and enriching the standards and include practical examples of ways to build a comprehensive and continuous set of learning experiences. ELA authors: Joyce VanTassel-Baska EdD, et al; Math authors: Susan Johnsen PhD, et al. Theoretical research base
Advanced Placement (AP) classes 2, 3 H ELA, MATH Program The Advanced Placement Program, run by the College Board, offers advance curriculum and external examination in multiple subject areas. Specifically trained high school teachers offer college-level courses and prepare students to pass stringent college-level examinations in that area. Students with advanced AP scores are often able to count these courses as college credit or to place out of introductory college courses.

College Board AP Central. See AP Site for Students. See Brown, E. (2010). Advanced placement programs and gifted students: The practical strategies series in gifted education. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.
Experimental National Association for Gifted Children: Gifted Education Works - Advanced Placement study findings can be found here.
Advancing Differentiation: Thinking and Learning for the 21st Century (book) 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice, Resource Author: Richard Cash, EdD. This guide provides differentiated research-based instructional strategies to help teachers: 1) build achievement motivation and self-regulation; 2) set student and teacher roles that encourage learner autonomy; 3) inspire creativity; and 4) design rigorous E4 curriculum (Effective, Engaging, Enriching, and Exciting). Includes over 50 illustrative figures, diagrams, and sample lessons in all content areas. PLC/Book Study Guide available. Free Spirit Publishing. Theoretical research base Differentiation.
ALEKS (Assessment and LEarning in Knowledge Spaces) 1, 2, 3 I, M, H MATH Program ALEKS is a web-based, adaptive learning system. Each student is provided individualized computer-based instruction built on a profile of the concepts the student knows and where next step support is needed. Students can work to mastery on their learning paths at their own pace. Textbook integration provided. Can be used as core or supplemental learning. Fully bilingual in English and Spanish. Visit here for more information. None /anecdotal / perception, Theoretical research base, Program evaluation Research can be found here and here.
Alice 2, 3 H MATH Software Created at Carnegie Mellon, Alice was designed to be a student's first exposure to object-oriented programming. Students use Alice allows students to learn fundamental programming concepts in the context of creating animated movies and simple video games. In Alice, 3-D objects (e.g., people, animals, and vehicles) populate a virtual world and students create a program to animate the objects. Available as a free download.

Software download, teaching materials, and other resources available here.
Program evaluation, Experimental Research studies and evaluation reports can be found here.
American Mathematics Competitions 2, 3 M, H MATH Competition The purpose of the American Mathematics Competitions is to increase interest in mathematics and to develop problem solving through competition. Three competitions are available: AMC 8 (middle school math concepts), AMC 10 (algebra and geometry concepts), and AMC 12 (pre-calculus concepts). Each competition is a timed multiple choice test.

American Mathematics Competitions. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
American Scholastic Math Association Contests 1, 2, 3 M, H MATH Competition This worldwide mathematics enrichment competition provides students with an opportunity to solve sets of challenging problems designed by a panel of creative mathematicians. Separate HS and Jr High problem sets are distributed according to a schedule, six times per year, Oct - March. Students have 35 minutes to complete the problems. Any number of students may participate each time, with the top 8 scores reported to the Association. Awards are given to top-scoring students and schools.

American Scholastic Mathematics Association. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
Art of Problem-Solving curriculum 3 M, H MATH Program The Art of Problem Solving is designed as a complete curriculum for high-performing students in grades 6-10, presenting a broad and deep exploration of challenging mathematics. The set provides student texts, solution manuals, an online learning system, and a collection of videos, aligned to the textbooks. Introductory books include Prealgebra, Algebra, Counting and Probabilty, Geometry, and Number Theory. The intermediate series includes Algebra, Counting and Probability, Precalculus, and Calculus. A set of diagnostic tests is available to determine accurate level placement. Texts can also be used to supplement existing curriculum and/or to prepare students for Math competitions, e.g. MATHCOUNTS, AMC, and AIME.

The Art of Problem Solving. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013). Testimonials provided here.
AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) - Secondary 1, 2, 3 M, H ELA, MATH Program The AVID program, started in 1980, was designed to prepare promising students who are educationally disadvantaged for success in college and beyond. Typically, these students are the first in their family to attend college, from low-income families, and/or students of color. The secondary level AVID curriculum focuses on WICOR: Writing, Inquiry, Collaboration, Organization, and Reading. These essential skills are embedded in an elective course and the challenging core content courses in which AVID students are enrolled.

AVID. See here.
Program evaluation, Qualitative research, Experimental Results of multiple external research studies and program evaluations can be found here. Findings from Internal studies are found here.
AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) -Elementary 1, 2, 3 P, I ELA, MATH Program The schoolwide Elementary program is a new addition to AVID's system to prepare all students for college readiness and close achievement gaps. Unlike the secondary program, the elementary version is a schoolwide effort, with WICOR (Writing, Inquiry, Collaboration, Organization, and Reading) elements embedded throughout all academic classes at all elementary grade levels.

AVID. See here.
Theoretical research base The theoretical frameworks on which AVID Elementary was developed can be found here.
Battle of the Books 1, 2, 3 I, M, H ELA Competition Battle of the Books is a reading incentive competition that encourages students to read a variety of books from an annual selected book list. Four levels of book lists are available: grades 3-4, 5-6, 7-8, and Young Adult. In the competition (the "battle"), student teams are asked to recall information about plots, characters, and settings, identifying the title and author of the matching book.

Battle of the Books. See here.

America's Battle of the Books. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
Beast Academy 2, 3 P, I MATH Program Beast Academy is a complete elementary school Mathematics curriculum for high performing students in grades 2-5. Each grade level series consists of four sets of two books: a Guide book presenting the lessons and a Practice book providing exercises and problems to reinforce the lessons. Grade 3 materials available in Summer 2013; Grade 4 available in 2013/14 school year, followed by grade 5, then grade 2. This series was developed to lead into the Art of Problem-Solving middle and high school curriculum. Pre-assessments are available to identify accurate placement within each book in the series.

Beast Academy. See here.

Art of Problem-Solving. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
Brainology 1, 2, 3 I, M ELA, MATH Program Brainology is a for-purchase blended curriculum (online and face-to-face) that teaches students how the brain functions, learns, and remembers, and how it changes in a physical way when we exercise it. While the program is not specifically targeted to improve achievement in ELA or Mathematics, the intent of the program is to help students understand more fully the impact of effort and persistence on their achievement v. innate ability. This mind set work is particularly important for students who experience early school success (esp. girls) and fear failure/are perfectionistic, as well as students historically marginalized from advanced coursework (e.g. students of color, low SES, ELL) Professional development modules and a whole-school program is also available.

Mindset Works. See here.
Theoretical research base, Experimental Theoretical research and studies can be found here.
Brilliant 3 M, H MATH Resource Brilliant's mission is to bring together smart, driven young people from around the world. It seeks to find them early, connect them to each other, measure and develop their problem solving ability, and connect them to opportunities. Brilliant's problems are created by people all over the world, including olympiad champions and university professors. Members learn how to solve problems by engaging in a community of students, educators, and enthusiasts. Includes thousands of free problems, quizzes, explanations, and examples. Click here for more. Theoretical research base Mentoring; Communities of Practice
CCSS ELA Learning Progressions 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA Resource "Learning progressions of the Common Core State Standards in ELA provide a vertical alignment of standards between grade levels. Educators can use progressions to see the extent of change in standards as students progress from one grade level to the next. Progressions can be used to accelerate content and create appropriate and meaningful learning experiences for advanced learners. Progressions also show the overlap in the same standard strands at different grade levels. ELA Progressions: 1) Wisconsin DPI Vertical Articulation of CCSS; 2) A Teacher's Guide to Using the Common Core State Standards With Gifted and Advanced Learner in the English Language Arts (Hughes, et al.) - book" Theoretical research base "Hess, K.K. and Kearns, J. (2011). Learning Progressions Frameworks Designed for use with the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts & Literacy K-12. Available online here.
Challenge Zone 1, 2, 3 P, I, M MATH Resource Higher level thinking games and problems for students. Developed by Stanford University Advanced Learning Dept. Learn more by clicking here. Theoretical research base Visit this link for more.
Challenging Units for Gifted Learners: Teaching the Way Gifted Students Think 2, 3 M ELA, MATH Resource The units in this series help students use their learning styles and potential to develop intellectual expertise and produce new ideas. Prufrock Press. None /anecdotal / perception
College of William and Mary Center for Gifted Education Language Arts Units 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA Program Literature units, developed by William and Mary Gifted Education Center, focus on higher order skills, including developing students' analytic and interpretive skills in literature, persuasive writing skills, linguistic competency, listening/oral communication skills, issue-based research skills, reasoning skills, and understanding an overarching concept. Most of the units focus on the overarching concept of change. Reading selections were chosen based on their readability levels, connection to an overarching concept, and multicultural emphases. Multiple units are available, spanning grades K-12. Student and Teacher Guides for each unit can be purchased from Kendall Hunt.

William and Mary Center for Gifted Education. See here.

Kendall Hunt. See here.

Alignment to ELA CCSS see here.
Theoretical research base, Experimental Summary of findings and original research found in the College of Wm & Mary Center for Gifted Education document, What Works: 20 Years of Curriculum Development and Research for Advanced Learners, 1988-2008. Click here.
College of William and Mary Center for Gifted Education Mathematics Units 2, 3 P, I, M MATH Program These Math units were developed by William and Mary Gifted Education Center. Materials contain a high level of sophistication of ideas that challenge the most able learners. Potential exists for tailoring content to individual needs. Opportunities exist for student exploration based on interest. Units available include: Spatial Reasoning, grades 2-4 Beyond Base Ten, grades 3-6 Moving Through Dimensions, grades 6-8.

William and Mary Center for Gifted Education. See here.

Units available from Prufrock Press. See here.
Theoretical research base Theoretical research base is described in the College of Wm & Mary Center for Gifted Education document, What Works: 20 Years of Curriculum Development and Research for Advanced Learners, 1988-2008. Available here.
Creative Thinking 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice Creative thinking encourages students to use a variety of approaches to solve problems, analyze multiple viewpoints, adapt ideas, and arrive at new solutions. Sometimes it is referred to as divergent thinking. Strategies can be introduced using direct instruction in creative problem solving models and creative thinking processes. The processes are generally considered to be fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration.

Feldhusen, J.F. & Treffinger, D.J. (1985). Creative thinking and problem solving in gifted education, 3rd ed. Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt Publishing. Kingore, B. (Spring 2004). High achiever, gifted learner, creative learner. Understanding Our Gifted. See here.
Theoretical research base A summary of the theoretical research base supporting Creative Thinking can be found here.
Critical Thinking 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice Critical thinking requires deep, structured thought. It involves higher order skills (i.e., applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating), logical argument, and reasoning. Critical thinking can be traced back to Socrates. The great philosopher believed that we should ask deep, probing questions before we accept ideas as worthy. In this way, we gather evidence to closely examine reasoning and assumptions.

Boswell, C. and Carlile, V.D. (2010). RTI for the gifted student. Hawthorne, NJ: Educational Impressions.
Theoretical research base A summary of the theoretical research base supporting Critical Thinking can be found here.
CueThink 1, 2, 3 I, M, H MATH Resource iPad app to improve critical thinking skills and math communication of students in grades 4-12. With CueThink, students use a structured process to create and present their solutions. As they solve the problems, they work together in virtual groups, learning from their friends’ “a-ha moments” as well as their errors and missteps. For more information click here. Theoretical research base See Polya's 4 phases of problem solving.
Curriculum Compacting 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice Curriculum compacting is a useful tool for modifying the core curriculum. The procedure is relatively simple. Prior to instruction, determine what students already know and can do using pre-assessment. For those who’ve already mastered most of the material, replace and extend the core curriculum using more challenging learning opportunities. Curriculum compacting can also be effective for those students that may not have already mastered the majority of content and skills, but may learn material quickly. They can benefit from instruction, but will require fewer repetitions for mastery. Abbreviate the core assignments using a strategy like Five Hardest, then provide alternate challenging activities.

Reis, S.M. & Renzulli, J.S. (2005). Curriculum compacting: An easy start to differentiating for high-potential students. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press. Winebrenner, S. (2001). Teaching gifted kids in the regular classroom: Strategies and techniques every teacher can use to meet the academic needs of the gifted and talented (revised, expanded, updated). Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.
Theoretical research base A summary of the theoretical research base supporting Curriculum Compacting can be found here.
Davidson Young Scholars Program 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Resource The Davidson Young Scholars Program provides free services to nurture and support profoundly gifted young people. Qualifying students and their parents receive the following assistance: Free Consulting Services, An Online Community, Annual Get-Togethers, Ambassador Program, Davidson Summer STARS, Free Guidebooks and Davidson Discussion Videos. Eligibility criteria are available on the Davidson Institute for Talent Development.

Davidson Institute for Talent Development. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
Descartes' Cove 2, 3 M MATH Resource Presented in modules, students explore mathematical concepts and are challenged to extend their knowledge to become more confident in their abilities, develop problem solving skills, learn to reason mathematically, and apply an understanding of mathematics to real-world problems. Descartes' Cove covers a broad range of topics, and mathematical connections between the modules are a prominent feature of the series. For more information, click here. Theoretical research base You can find more information here.
Differentiating Instruction With Menus (series) 1, 2 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Resource The series provides teachers with tools to challenge and reach both gifted and advanced students in the classroom, including enrichment, choice in independent practice, or academic options resulting from curriculum compacting. Each book includes a rubric that can assess different types of products, free choice proposal forms to encourage independent study, specific guidelines for each of the products included in the menus to save the teacher time, and challenging menus to meet the needs of these diverse higher level learners. Prufrock Press. Theoretical research base Differentiation
Differentiation for Gifted Learners: Going Beyond the Basics (book) 1 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice, Resource Authors: Diane Heacox, EdD and Richard M. Cash, EdD. Practical suggestions and ideas for teachers. Topics include: Common Core State Standards, real-world problem solving, abstract thinking, interdisciplinary concepts, authentic products, learning autonomy, accountability, grouping practices, affective curriculum, 21st-century skills, Advanced Placement and Honors classes, IB programs, underserved populations, twice-exceptional learners. Free Spirit Publishing. Theoretical research base Differentiation.
Differentiation that Really Works (series) 2 M, H ELA, MATH Resource Authors: Cheryll M. Adams PhD & Rebecca L. Pierce PhD. The Language Arts and Math books in this series provide time-saving tips and strategies from real teachers who teach language arts in grades 6–12. Strategies include tiered lessons, cubing, graphic organizers, exit cards, learning contracts, and choice boards. Every strategy includes directions and offers opportunities for differentiation. Prufrock Press. Theoretical research base Differentiation
Ed Zaccaro Mathematics resource books 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H MATH Resource Ed Zacarro books are designed for students with higher math ability and interest. Difficult math concepts are presented in kid-friendly formats (e.g. via cartoons and drawings). Books can be used for independent study or in a classroom setting. Titles include: Challenge Math for the Elementary and Middle School Student; Real World Algebra; Primary Grade Challenge Math; The 10 Things all Future Mathematicians and Scientist Must Know; Scammed By Statistics 25 Real Life Math Investigations That Will Astound Teachers and Students; and Becoming a Problem Solving Genius.

About Ed Zacarro and books. See Prufrock Press
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
Equate! 2, 3 P, I, M, H MATH Resource Game invented by a veteran math teacher. Players use tiles to form vertical or horizontal math equations. It requires computing and thinking strategically, critically, and creatively. Earn higher scores using division or fraction tiles and landing on premium board positions. Equate! includes 190 number and operation tiles, four tile racks, and rules booklet. Two to four players or teams. Junior and advanced editions available. For more information, click here. None /anecdotal / perception For more information, click here.
First in Math 1, 2, 3 P, I, M MATH Program First In Math is an online curriculum supplement. Builds fluency for addition through algebra-ready students while advancing higher-order thinking skills such as mental math, problem solving, pattern sensing, reasoning, and number sense through Deep Practice. Allows for personalized digital learning. For more information, click here. Program evaluation For further information, click here.
Future Problem Solving Program 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Program, Competition The goal of Future Problem Solving is to engage students how to work in teams or independently to solve global issues, solve community problems, or submit scenario writing. With the help of a facilitator/coach, students evaluate and analyze information from a variety of sources to create action plans. Diverse perspectives are encouraged. Competitive and non-competitive options are available for different grade bands. Teacher/coach training is recommended. Workshops are periodically run in Wisconsin.

Wisconsin Future Problem Solving. See here.

Future Problem Solving Program International. See here.

FPS alignment with 21st Century Skills. See here.
Theoretical research base The research base supporting Future Problem Solving can be found here.
Grade Acceleration 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice Grade acceleration is appropriate to consider for any student who is performing beyond his/her current grade level. Whereas subject-based acceleration moves students ahead in one or two specific content areas, full grade acceleration shortens the number of years a student spends in the K-12 or K-16 educational system.

Assouline, S.G., Colangelo, N., Lupkowski-Shoplik, A., Forstadt, L., & Lipscomb, J. (2009). Iowa acceleration scale, 3rd ed. Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press. Colangelo, N., Assouiline, S.G., & Gross, M.U.M. (2004). A nation deceived. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa. Rogers, K.B. (2002). Re-forming gifted education. Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press. Winebrenner, S. (2001). Teaching gifted kids in the regular classroom: Strategies and techniques every teacher can use to meet the academic needs of the gifted and talented (revised, expanded, updated). Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.
Theoretical research base A summary of the theoretical research base supporting Grade Acceleration can be found here.
Great Books Read-Alouds 2, 3 P ELA Program Great Books Read-Alouds are high quality, complex stories and poems for K-1 students to listen to and discuss. Students asked to develop original questions, listen to others, form opinions, draw / act out scenes, and do group creative writing.

Great Books Foundation. Click here.
Theoretical research base The research base supporting Great Books Read Alouds can be found here.
Guiding Advanced Readers in Middle School (book) 2, 3 M ELA Resource Author: Teresa S. Masiello, EdD. This book helps teachers and parents understand the characteristics and needs of gifted students, as well as ways in which to differentiate reading instruction for them. It also contains activities for four different trade books that will interest and challenge gifted middle school readers. Many reproducible activities, including literature circles, tiered activities, graphic organizers, and higher-level thinking discussion questions. Theoretical research base Differentiation
Independent Contracts 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice Independent contracts are also referred to as learning contracts. Contracts begin with a conversation between the student and the teacher to select a topic to explore independently. They come to agreement about what will be learned and how the student will demonstrate this learning and formalize it in a signed contract.

Boswell, C. and Carlile, V.D. (2010). RTI for the gifted student. Hawthorne, NJ: Educational Impressions. Reis, S.M. & Renzulli, J.S. (2005). Curriculum compacting: An easy start to differentiating for high-potential students. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press. Renzulli, J. (1978). The compactor. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press. Winebrenner, S. (2001). Teaching gifted kids in the regular classroom: Strategies and techniques every teacher can use to meet the academic needs of the gifted and talented (revised, expanded, updated). Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.
Theoretical research base A summary of the theoretical research base supporting Grade Acceleration can be found here.
Inquiry models 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice Inquiry models engage students in actively investigating a discipline, actively searching for knowledge or understanding. Students generate questions or identify issues or problems relevant to a content area, then collect and interpret information or data to answer the question or solve the issue or problem. Some disciplines have one or more inquiry models that are specific to their way of thinking. Other disciplines use more generic approaches.

Ontario inquiry model K-12. See here.

The big 6. See here

Mandell, N. and Malone, B. (2007). Thinking like a historian: Rethinking history instruction. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Historical Society. Also see here.

Winebrenner, S. (2001). Teaching gifted kids in the regular classroom: Strategies and techniques every teacher can use to meet the academic needs of the gifted and talented (revised, expanded, updated). Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.
Theoretical research base A summary of the theoretical research base supporting the Inquiry Model can be found at here.
Interactive Discovery-Based Units for High-Ability Learners 2, 3 M ELA, MATH Resource Series provides engaging curriculum units that culminate with activities for students to demonstrate academic understanding with real-world, open-ended opportunities. Each book in the series contains tiered lessons that teachers can easily modify to meet individual students' needs. Prufrock Press. Theoretical research base Differentiation
Interactive Discovery-Based Units for High-Ability Learners 2, 3 M ELA, MATH Resource Series provides engaging curriculum units that culminate with activities for students to demonstrate academic understanding with real-world, open-ended opportunities. Each book in the series contains tiered lessons that teachers can easily modify to meet individual students' needs. Prufrock Press. Theoretical research base Differentiation
Internships 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice Internships match a student with an expert or professional to explore a strength or intense interest of the student. As compared with mentorships, internships generally occur outside of school, are more structured, and have a career or vocational emphasis.

State of Wisconsin DPI Career Exploration. See here.

Robinson, A., Shore, B.M., & Enersen, D.L. (2007). Best practices in gifted education: An evidence-based guide. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

Rogers, K.B. (2002). Re-forming gifted education. Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press.

Strip, C.A. (2000). Helping gifted children soar. Scottsdale, AZ: Gifted Psychology Press.

Treffinger, D.J., Young, G.C., Nassab, C.A., & Witting, C.V. (2004). Enhancing & expanding gifted programs: The levels of service approach. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

Theoretical research base A summary of the theoretical research base supporting Internships can be found at here.
IXL 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Program IXL provides online standards-aligned math and language arts practice for K–12 students. Adaptive to allow for personalized learning. Provides goal-setting, progress, and performance reports. For more information, click here. Theoretical research base, Program evaluation For a further look into the research, click here.
Jacob's Ladder Reading Comprehension Program (College of William and Mary Center for Gifted Education) 1, 2, 3 I ELA Program

Jacob's Ladder scaffolds reading comprehension and critical thinking skills. To analyze and interpret individual readings in poetry, myths/fables, and nonfiction, students move along three skill "ladders," from lower order, concrete thinking skills to higher order, critical thinking skills. Ladder A, for example, moves students from Sequencing to Cause and Effect to Consequences and Implications. Designed originally for to support lower income students in heterogeneous classrooms.

William and Mary Center for Gifted Education Curriculum. See here.

William and Mary Center for Gifted Education Curriculum. See here.
Experimental Summary of findings available here.
Junior Great Books 1, 2, 3 P, I, M ELA Program Junior Great Books provides a framework for teaching reading comprehension, critical thinking, and writing, all in the context of students sharing ideas about high-quality literature selections. Discussion leaders serve as partners in inquiry with their students, helping the group work together to discover meaning in a story and build interpretations. In the Shared Inquiry discussion, leaders and students think and talk about an interpretive question that arises from a particular story. Teacher training is recommended and is provided by Junior Great Books.

Junior Great Books. Click here.
Theoretical research base, Program evaluation, Meta-analysis Compilation of studies and theoretical research base for Junior Great Books can be found here.
Karin Hess' Cognitive Rigor Matrices 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice, Resource Karin Hess' Cognitive Rigor Matrix (CRM) applies Webb's Depth of Knowledge (DOK) levels to Bloom's Cognitive Process Dimensions. Hess' matrices are used to add cognitive rigor (complexity) to curriculum and can be used to design assessments. Hess' CRMs are currently used by SBAC to design assessment questions in both ELA and mathematics. Theoretical research base "Hess, K.K., Carlock, D., Jones, B., and Walkup, J.R. (2009). What exactly do 'fewer, clearer, and higher standards' really look like in the classroom? Using a cognitive rigor matrix to analyze curriculum, plan lessons, and implement assessments." For more information, click here.
Khan Academy 1, 2, 3 P, I, M MATH Program This free, online learning platform provides students with access to an extensive video library, practice exercises, and assessments on a variety of math topics from early number sense through calculus. Khan Academy provides a self-paced environment in which students listen to lectures and engage in interactive activities geared toward content mastery. Students who easily grasp a concept can move on quickly. Students can create accounts and add their teacher/s as coaches. Teachers can then monitor student progress.

Khan Academy. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
Make Up Your Mind: A Classroom Guide to 10 Age-Old Debates 1, 2, 3 M, H ELA Resource Authors: Clark G. Porter PhD and James M. Girsch PhD. Presents 10 pervasive intellectual conflicts that have captivated the world of ideas for centuries and continue to influence modern thought, including free will vs. determinism, nature vs. nurture, and liberalism vs. conservatism. Each chapter offers background information and a variety of discussion starters, journal prompts, skits, readings, and student assignments. Students will sharpen their critical thinking skills as they wrestle with contradictions that continue to challenge all people, shaping dialogue about contemporary issues. Prufrock Press. None /anecdotal / perception
Math Circles 3 M, H MATH Practice Math Circles are a form of education enrichment and outreach that bring mathematicians and mathematical scientists into direct contact with pre-college students. Students meet with mathematical professionals in an informal setting to work on interesting problems or topics in mathematics. The goal is to get the students excited about mathematics by providing a setting that encourages them to become passionate about mathematics. Athletes have sports teams that deepen their involvement with sports; math circles can play a similar role for kids who like to think about math. One thing all math circles have in common is that the students enjoy learning mathematics, and the circle gives them a social context in which to do so. The site includes a database of problem sets, lesson plans, and a directory of math circle locations. For more information, click here. None /anecdotal / perception
Math Olympiads 2, 3 I, M MATH Competition Math Olympiads provides math problem solving contests for teams of up to 35 students. Two grade divisions are available: 4-6 and 6-8. Teams meet for an hour each week to explore a topic or strategy in depth or they practice for the contests, using nonroutine problems from prior year competitions or other sources. Teams compete in five monthly contests, from November to March.

Math Olympiad. Click here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013). Teacher and student testimonials provided here.
Mathalicious! 1, 2, 3 I, M, H MATH Program Mathalicious lessons explore the math behind real-world topics, from sports to shopping to the odds of finding life on other planets. Lessons encourage discussion, challenge students to construct arguments, justify their reasoning, and use mathematics to think more critically about the world. Lessons are aligned to the Common Core State Standards, promoting higher-order thinking and problem solving. Free and paid lessons available. For more information, click here. Theoretical research base WWC Practice Guide: "Improving Mathematical Problem Solving in Grades 4 Through 8."
MATHCOUNTS 2, 3 M MATH Competition, Resource MATHCOUNTS is a national middle school club and/or competitive mathematics program to promote middle school mathematics achievement. At the beginning of each school year, every US middle school receives a free School Handbook. Teachers can use the handbook activities and problem sets as part of in-class instruction or as an extracurricular activity.

MATHCOUNTS. See here.

MATHCOUNTS competitions have written and oral rounds, as well as individual and team components. After several months of coaching, participating schools select students to compete individually or as part of a team innationwide competitions.

The MATHCOUNTS Club Program provides schools with the structure and activities to hold regular meetings of a math club. The Club can be used by schools as a stand-alone program or incorporated into student preparation for the competition series.

Theoretical research base The theoretical research base to support MathCounts can be found here.
Mentorships 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice Mentorships match a student with an expert or professional to explore a strength or intense interest of the student. Mentors can be school staff, parents, or community members. Mentorships can be school-based or can occur outside of school. Mentorships are most successful when the mentor (adult) has been trained and there are clear expectations. This can be helpful when working with students who have multi-potentiality issues.

For Hoagies Gifted list of mentorship resources click here.
Theoretical research base A summary of the theoretical research base supporting Mentorships can be found here.
Michael Clay Thompson ELA resource books 1, 2, 3 I, M, H ELA Resource Michael Clay Thompson has written a variety of resource books aimed at meeting the needs of advanced learners in the areas of grammar, composition, vocabulary, and poetry. Thompson’s approach includes vocabulary study based upon Latin and Greek stems, the use of classical literary examples, and the use of the Socratic approach for teaching. Each book has both a student text and a teacher manual. Titles include: Building Language, Caesars English I & II, Poetry, Plato and the Problem of Truth, and more. Published by Royal Fireworks Press. Find more information here. Theoretical research base Research supporting this resource can be found here.
Mindsets in the Classroom: Building a Culture of Success and Student Achievement in School (book) 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice Author: Mary Cay Ricci. Mindsets in the Classroom provides educators with ideas for ways to build a growth mindset school culture, where students are challenged to change their thinking about their abilities and potential. The book includes a planning template, step-by-step description of a growth mindset culture, and “look-fors” for adopting a differentiated, responsive instruction model teachers can use in the classrooms. It also highlights the importance of critical thinking and teaching students to learn from failure. The book includes a sample professional development plan and ideas for communicating the mindset concept to parents. Prufrock Press. Theoretical research base For research information, click here.
NAGC Award Winning Units 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Resource A collection of units awarded recognition from the Ntl. Association for Gifted Children Curriculum Network for outstanding curriculum materials for gifted learners. For information, click here. Accreditation / Expert Review
NaNo WriMo Young Writers Program 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA Competition NaNoWriMo (short for National Novel Writing Month) is a young writers program designed for writers of all ages, including adults. The challenge is for individuals or teams to complete an entire novel in 30 days, starting on Nov. 1 and ending on Nov 30. Resources, workbooks, and forums are available at the site. Anyone who submits a novel is awarded a certificate.

NaNo WriMo. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
National History Day 1, 2, 3 M, H ELA Program, Competition In the National History Day program, students choose historical topics related to a theme and conduct extensive primary and secondary research through libraries, archives, museums, oral history interviews and historic sites. After analyzing and interpreting their sources and drawing conclusions about their topics’ significance in history, students present their work in original papers, websites, exhibits, performances and documentaries. Products are entered into competitions in the spring at local, state and national levels where they are evaluated by professional historians and educators. Multiple teacher resources (lesson plans, parent letters, assessments) are available to support implementation of historical research in middle and high school classrooms.

National History Day. Click here.
Accreditation / Expert Review Findings from the Program Evaluation can be found here.
Navigators (College of William and Mary Center for Gifted Education) 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA Program Navigator units are a collection of questions and activities intended to support group or independent study of over 30 selected novels, from Jumanji to Macbeth. Novel studies encourage advanced readers to develop their skills at analyzing and interpreting literature through structured questions and activities that highlight themes and concepts, literary elements, and real world connections contained within the books. In addition, novel studies provide opportunities for students to develop their own vocabulary and writing skills by exploring and emulating the language and style used by authors.

College of William and Mary Center for Gifted Education Navigator units. See here.
Theoretical research base Theoretical research base upon which Navigators was developed can be found in document College of Wm & Mary Center for Gifted Education What Works: 20 Years of Curriculum Development and Research for Advanced Learners, 1988-2008. See here.
NewsELA 1, 2, 3 I, M, H ELA Resource The site provides multiple new articles every day on a range of high interest topics/current events. Each article is available at five reading levels (from 720L - adult). Free and paid subscription options. For more information, click here. Program evaluation For research findings on this resource, click here.
NIKTU: A Game of Algebraic Thinking 1, 2, 3 P, I, M MATH Resource Niktu is a supplemental math card game that provides a review of equation solving and basic computation in a motivating game format. The interactive nature of the card game and equations foster cooperative learning and mastery of both algebra and basic computation skills. Kits available in six levels. For more information, click here. None /anecdotal / perception
Noetic Learning Math Contest 2, 3 P, I, M MATH Competition The Noetic Learning Math Contest is a biannual math challenge for students in grades 2-6. During the contest, students are given 45 minutes to solve 20 problems covering a broad range of mathematics skills taught in school. The goal of the competition is to encourage young students' interest in math, to develop their problem solving skills, and to inspire them to excel in math. There is a fee for student teams and questions.

Noetic Math Contest. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013). Teacher testimonials can be found here.
North American Computational Linguistics Olympiad Competition 3 M, H ELA, MATH Competition This olympiad is a contest in which middle or high-school students solve linguistic puzzles. In solving the problems, students learn about the diversity and consistency of language, while exercising logic skills. No prior knowledge of linguistics or second languages is necessary. Professionals in linguistics, computational linguistics and language technologies use dozens of languages to create engaging problems that represent cutting edge issues in their fields. The competition has attracted top students to study and work in those same fields.

North American Computational Linguistics Olympiad Competition. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
North Carolina Department of Education CCSS Learning Progressions for ELA and Disciplinary Literacy 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA Resource Learning progressions of the Common Core State Standards in ELA provide a vertical alignment of standards between grade levels. Educators can use progressions to see the extent of change in standards as students progress from one grade level to the next. Progressions can be used to accelerate content and create appropriate and meaningful learning experiences for advanced learners. Progressions also show the overlap in the same standard strands at different grade levels. The North Carolina Dept. of Education provides two useful interactive tools for educators. For English Language Arts standards, click here. For Disciplinary literacy, click here. Theoretical research base Hess, K.K. and Kearns, J. (2011). Learning Progressions Frameworks Designed for use with the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts & Literacy K-12. Available online here.
Northwestern Center for Talent Development Gifted Learning Links 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Program Gifted Learning Links are on-line enrichment, honors, and AP courses for advanced students developed and offered by the Northwestern Center for Talent Development. Courses provide rigorous, individualized instruction to help advanced students achieve their educational goals. Nine-week, 14-week, and 9-month options are available.

Northwestern University Center for Talent Development Gifted Learning Links. Click here.
Accreditation / Expert Review Northwestern Center for Talent Development is accredited by NCACS as a "Special Function School." This accreditation allows CTD to grant HS credit for courses and assures that all courses are student-oriented and rigorous. For specific research about Gifted Learning Links, see here.
Nrich Maths 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H MATH Resource NRICH is a UK-developed project whose aim is to enrich the experience of the mathematics curriculum for all learners by developing mathematical thinking and problem-solving skills, and showing rich mathematics in meaningful contexts. The site offers free challenging and engaging activities, problems, games, and rich tasks to use in K-12 classrooms. Materials are assigned difficulty levels, helping teachers differentiate and challenge students at different levels. Supporting teaching materials and professional development articles are also available at no cost.

Nrich Maths. See here.
Accreditation / Expert Review Evaluation studies and annual reports of Nrich work can be found here.
Odyssey of the Mind 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Competition Odyssey of the Mind is an international program that provides creative problem-solving opportunities for student teams. Team members apply their creativity to solve problems that range from building mechanical devices to presenting their own interpretation of literary classics. They then bring their solutions to competition on the local, state, and world levels. Thousands of teams from throughout the U.S. and the world participate in the program. For more information, click here. None /anecdotal / perception
Origo Think Tank Problem Solving 2, 3 I, M MATH Resource Sequenced activity cards for Grades 1–6 for developing the ability to solve problems across all strands and to think, reason, and work mathematically. For small group work, extensions, and fast-finisher activities, see here. Theoretical research base See Polya's 4 phases of problem solving.
PBS Go Writers Contest 2, 3 P, I ELA Competition, Resource For the PBS Go Writers Contest, students in grades K-3 submit illustrated stories to their local PBS station. Each station chooses winners, who are then submitted for entry in the national contest. Submissions are judged on the following criteria: 40% Creativity and originality of plot and/or themes, 40% Story structure and use of literary devices, 20% Relevance, quality and originality of illustration. Past student entries are available online. These stories can be used in classrooms as student exemplars or for student analysis.

PBS Go Writers Contest. Click here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
PowerV Word Selector 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA Resource The Lexile "PowerV" Word Selector provides vocabulary lists for over 50,000 books. This online tool identifies up to 10 challenging words in each book that are important for students to know. PowerV uses four criteria to identify words: 1) have Lexile measures 50L to 250L higher than the Lexile measure of the book, 2) appear more frequently in a particular book than in texts generally, 3) are academic and have been identified as important for success in school, and 4) have a number of prefixed and suffixed forms, allowing students to apply word knowledge to several other forms of the word. Educators can use the tool to select words for vocabulary instruction; parents and students can use the tool to identify words students might want to familiarize themselves with prior to reading a particular book. For more information, click here. Theoretical research base See Academic Vocabulary.
Pre-Assessment 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice Pre-assessment provides a way for teachers to gather key information about what students know and are able to do prior to instruction, as well as what student interests and learning styles are. Pre-assessments can be paper and pencil tasks or performance-based. They provide evidence to help teachers effectively match instruction with the needs of students. This includes decisions about content, pacing, materials, grouping, and specific learning activities.

Buehl, D. (2001). Classroom strategies for interactive learning. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Chapman, C. & King, R. (2003). Differentiated instructional strategies for reading in the content areas. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Gregory, G.H. & Chapman, C. (2002). Differentiated instructional strategies. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Gregory, G.H. & Kuzmich, L. (2004). Data driven differentiation in the standards-based classroom. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Winebrenner, S. (2001). Teaching gifted kids in the regular classroom: Strategies and techniques every teacher can use to meet the academic needs of the gifted and talented. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.
Theoretical research base A summary of the theoretical research base supporting Pre-Assessment can be found here.
Problem-Based Curriculum Units & Studies for One 2, 3 M, H ELA Resource Units designed for large groups to individual students (Problem Studies for One). Presents complex issues from history. Includes analysis of primary documents from multiple perspectives. For more information, click here. Theoretical research base See Problem-Based Learning.
Problem-based learning 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice In problem-based learning, students examine and solve real-world interdisciplinary, ambiguous problems. Students use a series of predictable steps to define the problem, brainstorm and evaluate possible solutions, and create a final product. Problem-based learning addresses two characteristics of students with gifts and talents. First, it challenges students that absorb new information quickly by requiring them to create new knowledge between disciplines. Second, it engages students to explore topics in depth.

ALTEC. (n.d.) Checklists to support project based learning and evaluation. Retrieved from here.

Landsberger, J. (n.d.). Problem based learning. Retrieved from here.

Miller, A. (2011). How to write effective driving questions for project-based learning. Retrieved from here.

Spence, L.D. (n.d.). Problem based learning: Lead to learn, learn to lead. Retrieved from here.
Theoretical research base A summary of the theoretical research base supporting Problem-Based Learning can be found here.
Project M2: Mentoring Young Mathematicians 2, 3 P MATH Program Project M2s is a research-based mathematics program for academically talented primary grade. Project M² includes two units at each grade level, one unit focused on geometry, the other on measurement. Teacher's guides, student journals, manipulative kits, etc. can be purchased through Kendall Hunt.

Project M2. Click here.

Kendall Hunt. See here.
Experimental Results of research studies can be found here.
Project M³: Mentoring Mathematical Minds 2, 3 I MATH Program Project M³ was developed to motivate and challenge mathematically talented gr.3-5 students. Through a series of twelve supplemental curriculum units (three per grade), Project M³ introduces advanced math content via critical and creative problem solving and reasoning. Students are exposed to standards-based concepts through a variety of engaging investigations, projects and simulations. Rich verbal and written mathematical communication is a key component of Project M3. This six-time NAGC award-winning program can be used with any mathematics curriculum to provide additional support and address the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice. Teacher's guides, student journals, manipulative kits, etc. can be purchased through Kendall Hunt.

Project M3: Mentoring Mathematical Minds. See here.

Purchase units at Kendall Hunt. See here.
Experimental Results of research studies can be found here.
Questioning 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice Students with gifts and talents generally learn basic information and skills at a faster rate than their peers, so providing them questions and tasks that are more complex, more abstract, or go into more depth responds to their needs. All students should be exposed to tasks that stretch their thinking and challenge their perspectives, but providing students with gifts and talents these opportunities is particularly crucial for nurturing potential. By paying attention to the kinds of questions that you ask students and the types of tasks you provide them, you can ensure that your lessons engage all students and provide them ways to develop "flow".

Anderson, L. W., and Krathwohl, D. R., (Eds.). (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching and assessing: A revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of educational objectives: Complete edition. New York: Longman.

Gregory, G.H. and Chapman, C. (2002). Differentiated instructional strategies: One size doesn’t fit allI. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Kingore, B. (2006). Tiered instruction: Beginning the process. Teaching for High Potential, 5-6.

Roanoke County Public Schools (2007). Think-tac-toe. Retrieved from here.

Roberts, J.L. and Inman, T.F., Eds. (2009). Strategies for differentiating instruction:Best practices for the classroom. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.
Theoretical research base A summary of the theoretical research base supporting Questioning Techniques can be found here.
Quill and Scroll International Honorary Society for High School Journalists 2, 3 H ELA Competition Currently enrolled high school students, including Quill and Scroll members and non-members, are invited to enter the yearly International Writing and Photo Contest and Blogging Competition, co-sponsored by Quill and Scroll and the American Society of News Editors. Award divisions include blogging and other skill sets employed in contemporary scholastic journalism. Work appearing online or in print is acceptable. There is a small fee for each entry.

Quill and Scroll. Click here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
Quiz Bowl 2, 3 M, H ELA, MATH Competition National Academic Quiz Tournament (NAQT) provides a standardized, nationwide competition format for middle school and high school students. Questions are based on academic subjects and general knowledge. For more information, click here. None /anecdotal / perception
Red Oak Writing for Youth (Milwaukee area) 2, 3 M, H ELA Resource Red Oak Writing in Milwaukee Red Oak creates a supportive community of writers who have the same goal: to improve their writing and help others to do the same. Their youth program supports writers from grades 6 through 12 though Teen Writers’ Circles, Creative Writing Camps, special events, and school visits. For more information, click here. None /anecdotal / perception
Reel Math Challenge (MATHCOUNTS) 2, 3 M MATH Competition, Resource Using one of the problems included in the MATHCOUNTS School Handbook, teams of students create a video teaching the problem using a real-world application of the math concept on which the selected problem is based. Students who create the four top videos win an all-expense paid trip to MATHCOUNTS national competition. Videos are archived for use by teachers in showing real-world applications of math concepts. MATHCOUNTS Reel Math Competition. See here.

Archived Reel Math videos. Click here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
Renzulli Learning System 1, 2, 3 I, M, H ELA, MATH Program, Resource, Software Online, self-directed learning via fully-vetted resources specifically matched to student individual profiles. The Renzulli Profiler generates a personal profile of each student’s top interests, learning styles, and expression styles, making it easier for teachers to get to know their students and effectively differentiate instruction. Once a profile is generated, students and teachers may use it to guide their exploration of the 40,000 online educational resources in the Renzulli database. Students can engage in self-directed learning by exploring safe, fully-vetted resources that have been specifically matched to their individual profiles, and teachers can browse the database of resources to find activities that align to specific objectives, skills, or state and Common Core Standards.

Renzulli Learning. Click here.
Theoretical research base, Experimental Contact Renzulli Learning for research findings. Local success stories can be found here.
Rube Goldberg Machine Contest 2, 3 M, H MATH Competition The Rube Goldberg Machine Contest (RGMC) is an annual international competition that challenges teams of students from middle school to college age to compete in building the most elaborate and hilarious Rube Goldberg Machine. Promotes creative and abstract thinking and problem solving. For more information, click here. None /anecdotal / perception
Scholastic Kids Are Authors 2, 3 P, I, M ELA Competition Students in grades K–8 work in teams of three or more to write and illustrate their own book. One Grand-Prize winning fiction and one Grand-Prize winning nonfiction are published by Scholastic. There is no charge for submitting entries to the competition.

Scholastic Kids Are Authors. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
SEM-R (Schoolwide Enrichment Model - Reading) 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA Program The Schoolwide Enrichment Model - Reading (SEM-R) focuses on enrichment through engagement in challenging, self-selected reading accompanied by instruction in thinking and reading strategies. SEM-R was designed to increase enjoyment in reading, encourage students to pursue challenging independent reading, improve reading fluency, comprehension, and increase reading achievement. The SEM-R framework includes three phases: 1. Book Hooks (exposure to high interest books); 2. Supported Independent Reading (teacher conferencing, high order questions); and 3.Student Self-Choice Activities (e.g. genre studies, investigation centers, buddy reading...) SEM-R was designed to enhance, not replace, a solid foundation in language arts including phonics, vocabulary, and writing instruction. Many forms of school and teacher resources and supports are available.

Reis, S. (). Joyful Reading by Sally Reis The Joyful Reading Resource Kit by Sally Reis SEM-R. See here.
Theoretical research base, Experimental A comprehensive list of studies on the SEM-R can be found here.
SET (game) 1, 2, 3 P, I, M MATH Resource Game of visual perception. The goal is to be the first to see a SET from the 12 cards laid face up on the table. A SET is three cards that are either all the same or all different in each individual feature. Available at multiple levels and in multiple formats (card game, dice game, and online). For more information, click here. None /anecdotal / perception
Some of My Best Friends Are Books: Guiding Gifted Readers (book) 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA Resource Author: Judith Wynn Halsted. In its 3rd edition, this book describes the intellectual and emotional needs of children of high ability, typical and advanced reading patterns for grades K-12, and how parents and teachers can give reading guidance and discuss books with young readers. Includes a well-indexed annotated bibliography of more than 300 books for readers of all ages, selected to promote intellectual and emotional development (e.g., themes such as achievement, aloneness, arrogance, introversion, perfectionism, sensitivity, and resiliency). Published by Great Potential Press. Theoretical research base
Stanford University Giftedandtalented.com (formerly EPGY) 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Program Online k-12 tutor-supported and independent study courses in mathematics, language arts, science and computer programming. Courses feature a combination of multimedia instruction and automated assessment of student work to provide students with a highly-personalized, self-paced learning experience. For more information, click here. Meta-analysis For research information, click here.
StayAhead! 1, 2, 3 P, I MATH Program StayAhead!, an individualized online math program for grades 2-5 elementary school children.

StayAhead! from Noetic Learning.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
Stock Market Game 2, 3 I, M, H MATH Program, Competition The Stock Market Game provides grade 4 - 12 students with the opportunity to engage in real-world investing while learning academic concepts. No prior knowledge of the stock market is needed. Students work in teams to grow their $100,000 virtual cash accounts into a top-performing portfolios. Teams compete against their classmates as well as other schools. Teacher supports include lessons, projects, assessments, and standards correlations.

See Stock Market Game.
Experimental Research on the effectiveness of the Stock Market game on student performance in math can be found here.
Storybird 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H ELA Software Storybird is a free, online collaborative storytelling tool. Students are inspired to write stories based on collections of art. Students choose artwork, drag and drop pictures into their story, and write a story to match. Teachers can create student accounts and assignments. Students can collaborate with other students in their class or with someone from another country.

Storybird. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
Subject Acceleration 3 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice Acceleration is appropriate to consider for any student who is performing beyond his/her current grade level. Subject-based acceleration moves students ahead in one or two specific content areas as opposed to full grade acceleration, which shortens the number of years a student spends in the K-12 or K-16 educational system.

Colangelo, N., Assouiline, S.G., & Gross, M.U.M. (2004). A nation deceived. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa.

Rogers, K.B. (2002). Re-forming gifted education. Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press.

Winebrenner, S. (2001). Teaching gifted kids in the regular classroom: Strategies and techniques. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.

Theoretical research base A summary of the theoretical research base supporting Subject Acceleration can be found here.
Supplemental Mathematics for the Curious 3 H MATH Resource Supplemental books written by a math professor on number theory and number system. Written for the self-learner, the focus of the books is on deep conceptual development. Provides well-developed examples with ample comments to guide the student’s thinking, while answers to odd-numbered exercises provide feedback on the student’s progress. For more information, click here. None /anecdotal / perception
Teaching Gifted Kids in Today's Classroom: Strategies and Techniques Every Teacher Can Use 1 P, I, M ELA, MATH Practice Author: Susan Winebrenner. Guide to meeting the learning needs of gifted students in mixed-leveled classrooms. Includes practical, classroom-tested strategies and instructions for how to use them. The new edition provides information on using technology for accelerated learning, managing cluster grouping, increasing curriculum rigor, improving assessments, boosting critical and creative thinking skills, and addressing gifted kids with special needs. Free Spirit Publishing Theoretical research base Cluster grouping, acceleration, differentiation.
Teaching Success Guide for the Advanced Placement Classroom 2, 3 M, H ELA Resource This series helps teachers motivate students above and beyond the norm by introducing investigative, hands-on activities, including debates, role-plays, experiments, projects, and more, all based on Advanced Placement and college-level standards for learning. Supports Shakespeare and other classics. Prufrock Press. Theoretical research base Differentiation
Ten Marks Math 1, 2, 3 P, I, M, H MATH Program TenMarks is a web-based, adaptive learning system aligned with the CCSSM. Each student is provided instruction and practice built on a personalized playlist. Students can work to mastery on their learning paths at their own pace. For more information, click here. None /anecdotal / perception
The Cluster Grouping Handbook: A Schoolwide Model: How to Challenge Gifted Students and Improve Achievement for All 1 P, I, M, H ELA, MATH Practice Authors: Susan Winebrenner, MS, and Dina Brulles, PhD. Resource for administrators, gifted education program directors, and classroom teachers. The authors explain how Schoolwide Cluster Grouping differs from grouping practices of the past, and provide an implementation roadmap. Includes field-tested classroom strategies along with detailed information on identifying gifted students for clusters, gaining support from parents, and providing ongoing professional development. Special attention is directed toward empowering gifted English language learners. Free Spirit Publishing. Theoretical research base Cluster grouping.
ThinkCerca 1, 2, 3 I, M, H ELA Resource ThinkCERCA supports personalized literacy instruction across disciplines. Digital lessons engage students in making claims, supporting claims with text evidence, explaining their reasoning and counterarguments, and addressing varied audiences. Different levels of authentic text available. Supports peer collaboration. Rubrics/assessments built in. For more information, click here. Program evaluation For information on research, click here.
TIME for Kids’ (TFK) Kid Reporter Contest 3 P, I, M ELA Competition TFK Kid Reporter Contest is a talent search held in March each year for students younger than 13 years old. To enter the contest, students report on an interesting or unique event in their school or community. Ten students in the country are selected each year to report local and regional news stories for TIME For Kids magazine and TIME For Kids online. Judging of entries is based equally on creativity, originality, grammar and spelling, clarity, and newsworthiness.

Time For Kids Reporter Contest. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
Tynker: Coding for Kids 2, 3 I, M MATH Resource Tynker offers interactive courses for children to learn programming at their own pace as well as a grade-based curriculum for schools. Students learn programming through game-like puzzles, tutorials, and projects. Ready-to-use, grade-specific lesson plans and STEM project templates available for teachers. For more information, click here. None /anecdotal / perception For testimonials about the resource, click here.
USA Mathematical Talent Search 2, 3 M, H MATH Competition, Resource USAMTS is a free competition open to all US middle and high school students. Students are given one month to work out solutions to challenging problems ranging in difficulty from being within the reach of most high school students to challenging the best students in the nation. Students may use any materials - books, calculators, computers - but all the work must be their own. Carefully written justifications are required for each problem. USAMTS is run on the honor system - it is an individual competition, whose competitive role is very secondary. Student solutions to the USAMTS problems are graded by mathematicians with comments returned to students. USAMTS’ goal is to help students develop problem solving skills, improve technical writing abilities, and mature mathematically while having fun.

See USA Mathematical Talent Search.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
UW-Stevens Point High School Writers' Workshop 2, 3 H ELA Competition In existence for over 40 years, the UW-Stevens Point High School Writers' Workshop provides qualifying HS juniors and seniors a one-day opportunity to share and receive feedback on writing with UW-SP English faculty and guests. To apply, students submit writing samples in any or all of five genres, judged by English faculty. Accepted senior students are also eligibile to compete for UW-SP scholarships. For more information about the program, click here. Theoretical research base Mentoring.
WCATY (Wisconsin Center for Academically Talented Youth) Academy 3 I, M, H ELA, MATH Program The Academy combines online instruction with face-to-face workshops allowing academically talented students to interact in a learning community. The Academy offers a robust curriculum created using WCATY's research-based online curriculum design system. Each 9-week credit class is designed to replace a district's classroom offerings with cross-curricular, gifted-focused content. Typical Academy students perform in the top 5% of school population. The site provides a profile of characteristics linked to successful engagement with and completion of Academy courses.

WCATY Academy. See here.
Theoretical research base The theoretical research base on which WCATY Academy curricula and online experiences are based can be found here.
Wisconsin Poetry Outloud 1, 2, 3 H ELA Competition, Resource Poetry Out Loud is a recitation contest supported by the Wisconsin Arts Board, the Poetry Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Prizes totaling more than $100,000 are awarded at state and national competitions each year. Students can compete individually or in small groups. The Poetry Out Loud teacher’s guide provides lesson plans and materials for hands-on work, work in groups, and oral presentations for use in ELA classrooms (e.g. Freshman English poetry, Speech, AP-English, creative writing).

Wisconsin Arts Board Poetry Out Loud. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
Wonderopolis 1, 2, 3 P, I, M ELA Resource Each day, the site posts an intriguing question and explores it in a variety of ways. Designed to encourage new questions and paths of further exploration into real world happenings. Search feature in Educator section allows CCSS-aligned searches by subject and grade level. For more information, click here. None /anecdotal / perception
Woot Math 1, 2, 3 I, M MATH Program Online adaptive teaching software for teaching fractions. Tailors the learning progression based on each student’s performance in real time. Includes digital manipulatives for hands-on student modeling, personalized video instruction with scaffolded problems, and teacher dashboard with student progress and assessment data. For more information, click here. Experimental For research information, click here.
Wordmasters Challenge 1, 2, 3 I, M ELA Competition, Resource Wordmasters Challenge is a national competition for grades 3-8 that encourages growth in vocabulary and verbal reasoning. In meets, held 3x/year,students complete analogies. Excellence in the competition requires both mastery of the meanings of the vocabulary words and thoughtful reasoning about the relationships between these words and more familiar language. Two difficulty levels of word lists provided for each grade level. There is a fee to enter the competition and materials need to be purchased.

Wordmasters Challenge. See here.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
WordWright Challenge 1, 2, 3 H ELA Competition WordWright Challenge is a national HS reading competition that requires analytical reading of a range of prose and poetry selections.During the competition, students answer multiple choice questions about the text, emphasizing perceptive interpretation, sensitivity to language, and an appreciation of style. Contests average 40 minutes in length. Along with the contest materials, schools receive vocabulary lists for pre-test preparation as well as post-test discussion topics and essay questions. These materials can be useful as preparation for the verbal SAT I, the SAT II in English, and the English Advanced Placement exams in language and literature. There is a fee to enter the competition and materials need to be purchased.

See WordWright Challenge.
None /anecdotal / perception No formal research found at time of review (Spring, 2013).
Zupelz Logic Puzzles 2, 3 I, M MATH Resource Sequenced logical thinking number puzzles for grades 1-6 (600 total puzzles). Can be used by individuals or in group work. Comes with correlation to CCSSM. Find out more here. None /anecdotal / perception